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Return of strip-field farming creates haven for rare species in south Wales

Posted on Thursday, August 30th, 2018 by

Ranger Mark Hipkin tends to sunflowers at the National Trust’s strip fields farm. Photograph: John Miller/National Trust A pioneering farming project using field management techniques dating back to the 13th century has transformed a stretch of coast into a haven for endangered animals, birds, insects and wildflowers. The experimental return to “strip-field farming” […]

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Improving soil quality can slow global warming

Posted on Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 by

Worker in corn field. Widespread use of proven agricultural land management practices can help slow global warming. Credit: Heather Dang photo, UC Berkeley Low-tech ways of improving soil quality on farms and rangelands worldwide could pull significant amounts of carbon out of the atmosphere and slow the pace of climate change, according to a […]

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When They Said They Wanted to Rethink Agriculture, They Meant It

Posted on Friday, August 3rd, 2018 by

Figuring out how the world is going to feed 7 billion people (and counting) in a time of changing climate, richer diets, and already over-burdened land and water resources is going to require wholesale rethinking of global agricultural practices. Clearly, solving such 21st century challenges is not for people with faint hearts or imaginations, which […]

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Respecting the Value of Food: Eating What We Grow

Posted on Tuesday, July 31st, 2018 by

Hannah Semler, founder of food system consulting, Whole Crops, and co-founder of online farmers market, FarmDrop, guides her work with a simple message: respect. “An equitable food system has to start with respect for people and respect for nature.” Semler […]

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Carbon Farming Works. Can It Scale up in Time to Make a Difference?

Posted on Friday, July 27th, 2018 by

Lani Estill is serious about wool. And not just in a knitting-people-sweaters kind of way. Estill and her husband John own thousands of sweeping acres in the northwest corner of California, where they graze cattle and Rambouillet sheep, a cousin of the Merino with exceptionally soft, elastic wool. “Ninety percent of our income from […]

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Ancient people farmed the Amazon 4,500 years ago … and they did it better than we do

Posted on Thursday, July 26th, 2018 by

I spent a couple weeks with hunter-gatherers in the Amazon. While I was there, one Waorani man told me that his ancestors planted edible food in the forest. When they gather it now, they’re just reaping […]

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Italian scientist brings non-GMO “pasta power” climate adaptation solution to West Africa

Posted on Thursday, July 5th, 2018 by

A breakthrough in wheat-breeding has resulted in the ability to grow durum wheat in the extreme heat of famine-affected Senegal, Mauritania and Mali, potentially boosting the income for 1 million farming families, and therefore winning the 2017 Olam Prize for Innovation in Food Security. The genome fingerprinting research project led by Dr. […]

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The magical wilderness farm: raising cows among the weeds at Knepp

Posted on Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018 by

Orange tip butterflies jink over grassland and a buzzard mews high on a thermal. Blackthorns burst with bridal white blossom and sallow leaves of peppermint green unfurl. The exhilaration in this corner of West Sussex is not, however, simply the thrilling explosion of spring. The land is bursting with an unusual abundance of life; rampant […]

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In Kenya ,agroforestry is a win – win

Posted on Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018 by

The Cherangani people, an indigenous community in Kenya’s Rift Valley, have always called the Cherangani Hills Forest their ancestral home. Also known locally as the Sengwer, they were traditionally reliant on the forest for hunting and gathering, herbal medicines, honey, and sorghum and millet farming. Then the colonial government evicted them from the forest, only […]

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Mesquite in Mexico: The Renaissance of an Ancestral Staple Crop in a Time of Climate Change

Posted on Thursday, May 10th, 2018 by

Probably no other plant has played such a vital role in the ecologies, and among the human populations of the arid and semiarid regions of Mexico and the US, as the multifunctional mesquite tree. This extremely resilient and adaptable tree has a rich ethnobotanical history and holds great potential to become a major staple […]

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