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Two Studies Reveal Amazing Resilience of Older Forests

Posted on Friday, July 13th, 2018 by

Maybe you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but two recent studies revealed that old forests around the world are full of surprises. In Europe, scientists working to complete the first ever map of the continent’s old growth forests discovered there were more of them than previously […]

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These wild animals can help guard your garden

Posted on Tuesday, July 10th, 2018 by

When you grow plants for food, you’re part of a cultural revolution that dates back more than 10,000 years. It might not seem very revolutionary today, but agriculture helped our hunting-and-gathering ancestors sow the seeds of civilization. It was almost like humanity had finally begun to wean itself off the wilderness. As much as agriculture […]

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Italian scientist brings non-GMO “pasta power” climate adaptation solution to West Africa

Posted on Thursday, July 5th, 2018 by

A breakthrough in wheat-breeding has resulted in the ability to grow durum wheat in the extreme heat of famine-affected Senegal, Mauritania and Mali, potentially boosting the income for 1 million farming families, and therefore winning the 2017 Olam Prize for Innovation in Food Security. The genome fingerprinting research project led by Dr. […]

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Protecting plants by deterrents instead of killing insects

Posted on Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018 by

“It’s not just about the bees, it’s about the survival of humanity. Without the bees that pollinate a wide variety of plants, not only would our supermarket shelves be quite bare, but within a short time, it would no longer be possible to supply the world’s population with food.” The words of Professor […]

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The magical wilderness farm: raising cows among the weeds at Knepp

Posted on Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018 by

Orange tip butterflies jink over grassland and a buzzard mews high on a thermal. Blackthorns burst with bridal white blossom and sallow leaves of peppermint green unfurl. The exhilaration in this corner of West Sussex is not, however, simply the thrilling explosion of spring. The land is bursting with an unusual abundance of life; rampant […]

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In Kenya ,agroforestry is a win – win

Posted on Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018 by

The Cherangani people, an indigenous community in Kenya’s Rift Valley, have always called the Cherangani Hills Forest their ancestral home. Also known locally as the Sengwer, they were traditionally reliant on the forest for hunting and gathering, herbal medicines, honey, and sorghum and millet farming. Then the colonial government evicted them from the forest, only […]

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California is turning farms into carbon-sucking factories

Posted on Tuesday, May 15th, 2018 by

In a grand experiment, California switched on a fleet of high-tech greenhouse gas removal machines last month. Funded by the state’s cap-and-trade program, they’re designed to reverse climate change by sucking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. These wonderfully complex machines are more high-tech than anything humans have designed. They’re called plants. Seriously, though: Plants breathe in […]

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Mesquite in Mexico: The Renaissance of an Ancestral Staple Crop in a Time of Climate Change

Posted on Thursday, May 10th, 2018 by

Probably no other plant has played such a vital role in the ecologies, and among the human populations of the arid and semiarid regions of Mexico and the US, as the multifunctional mesquite tree. This extremely resilient and adaptable tree has a rich ethnobotanical history and holds great potential to become a major staple […]

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Healthy Soil: Good for the Farmer, Good for the Planet

Posted on Tuesday, May 1st, 2018 by

Many people believe that if you just focus on soil health, everything else will follow. This principal is prominently featured in a recent New York Times Magazine article, “Can Dirt Save the Earth?,” which examines the practicality of regenerative agriculture.Moises Velasquez-Manoof begins his lengthy piece with John Wick and his wife, Peggy Rathmann, two decades after they […]

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Wrangler puts its corporate weight behind soil health

Posted on Wednesday, April 25th, 2018 by

In his excellent book Growing a Revolution, David R. Montgomery suggests that for far too long we’ve been arguing over organic versus conventional agriculture. Instead, he says, we really should have been focused on soil health. You see, there are big organic farms that are losing soil hand over fist. And there are conventional farms […]

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